G1 – Pesquisador acredita ter achado 1° altar da civilização Inca no Brasil – notícias em Cacoal e Zona da Mata

Possível santuário foi descoberto em sítio de Alta Floresta do Oeste.No local foi achado pedra com 29 ‘bacias’, que corresponde a dias lunares.

Source: G1 – Pesquisador acredita ter achado 1° altar da civilização Inca no Brasil – notícias em Cacoal e Zona da Mata

Please follow and like us:
error

V de Cima – O Stonehenge português está escondido no Alentejo

O Cromeleque dos Almendres é o maior círculo de menires conhecido da Península Ibérica. Neste V de Cima, descubra os 95 menires remanescentes que são quase dois mil anos mais antigos do que o Stonehenge.

Source: V de Cima – O Stonehenge português está escondido no Alentejo

Please follow and like us:
error

mais uma dúvida histórica (Açores e os cortes nas pedras)

Estes cortes não foram feitos para cortar as pedras!

A pedra com furos em duas linhas foi encontrada por doutor Félix Rodriguese a pedra que os cortes em linha foi encontrada por Nélia Araújo e Mario Jorge Costa na Costa Norte de ilha de São Miguel Açores. A pedra que eu encontrei está num terreno muito perto do mar onde tem várias pedras muito maiores do que está na foto de cortes em linha. Estou a trabalhar cortando silvas e canas para ver se tem mais alguma informação. Tenho observado cortes em pedras e o tipo de cunha para cortar pedra é muito diferente daquelas marcas. Doutor. Félix Rodrigues continue a fazer este bom trabalho porque um dia haverá muitas pessoas a reconhecer o seu árduo trabalho sem ganhar nenhuns ###. Um grande abraço

Image may contain: plant, outdoor, nature and water
Image may contain: grass, plant, outdoor and nature
Please follow and like us:
error

os mistérios da colonização de Madagáscar

«The settlement of the Indian Ocean’s largest island is one of the great mysteries in humanity’s colonization of the globe. Madagascar lies just 400 kilometers off the East African coast. Yet the Malagasy people’s cuisine, rituals, and religious beliefs resemble those of Borneo, some 9000 kilometers to the east. Their language is more closely related to Hawaiian than to Bantu, and about half their genes can be traced to Austronesia—that is, Indonesia and the islands of the Pacific. Archaeological evidence of this distant connection was lacking, however.
Now, new studies—recent or soon-to-be-published—trace a wave of Austronesian colonization between 700 C.E. and 1200 C.E. The telltale evidence is, in effect, breadcrumbs: crops distinctive to Austronesia, sprinkled across Madagascar and neighboring islands. “We finally have a signal of this Austronesian expansion,” said Nicole Boivin, an archaeologist and director of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany, who discussed the findings at the recent Society for American Archaeology (SAA) meeting here.
The study by Boivin and her colleagues, published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found that these voyagers did not stop at Madagascar. Some also settled the Comoro Islands, scattered between Madagascar and the African coast. “The discovery of an Austronesian connection for the Comoros is surprising,” says David Burney, a paleobiologist at the National Tropical Botanical Garden in Koloa, Hawaii, who has studied the region. Yet the Austronesians stopped short of the African coast. “There was a culinary frontier,” says Alison Crowther, an archaeologist at the University of Queensland, St. Lucia, in Brisbane, Australia, who led the study.

Her team collected more than 2400 samples of botanical remains at 20 sites on the African mainland and on offshore islands and Madagascar, and obtained 43 radiocarbon dates from crop seeds. Between 700 C.E. and 1200 C.E., the researchers found a clear boundary between sites dominated by African crops like pearl millet, cowpea, and sorghum, and those with Asian rice, mung bean, and cotton. The Asian crops were common on the Comoros and on Madagascar, but rare on the East African coast.

A. Cuadra/Science; Adapted from Crowther et al., PNAS
The line traced by the study shows that the two regions, although close geographically, were worlds apart in their way of life, suggesting a wholesale colonization of Madagascar and the Comoros. A thousand years ago and more, Arab and Indian sailors conducted a bustling trade between East Africa to India. But the crops indicate that the settlers came from even farther east. Although Asian rice and mung bean are common on the Indian subcontinent, other common Indian crops like horse gram and urd (two legume varieties) are absent from the Madagascar and Comoros samples.
The genetic studies that support the group’s conclusion about an Asian colonization also link roughly half the genome in modern Malagasy to Africans. When the Africans arrived is a further mystery. “People have speculated that there might well have been a number of transitory arrivals—most likely from Africa—before settlement on the island really took off” with the arrival of Austronesians, says Peter Forster, an archaeologist at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom.
The late Yale University archaeologist Robert Dewar claimed in 2013 that people reached the island around 2000 B.C.E., millennia earlier than had been thought, based on radiocarbon dates of organic matter found with stone artifacts in a rock shelter on the north coast. But even members of Dewar’s team were not ready to rewrite Madagascar’s history. Burney, meanwhile, says that environmental data, such as signs of widespread burning, suggest the first humans more likely arrived around 400 B.C.E.
Based on studies of the unique megafauna Madagascar once hosted, including giant flightless birds and huge lemurs, paleoecologist Simon Haberle of the Australian National University in Canberra argues that the arrival was likely more recent. He reported at the SAA meeting that radiocarbon dating of fungi from the dung of megafauna at five sites in southwest Madagascar suggests that larger animals, like a 150-kilogram lemur, began to decline about 500 C.E., presumably because human hunters had reached the island by then. Megafauna extinctions gathered speed between 700 C.E. and 1000 C.E., coinciding with the wave of Austronesians.
The identity of the earlier settlers, whenever they made landfall, remains obscure. Madagascar still has hunter-gatherers such as the Mikea, who have an oral tradition asserting that they were the island’s original inhabitants, driven by later migrants into the dense forests of the island’s southwest. A 2013 study, however, found that the group is genetically similar to the Malagasy: a mixture of African Bantu and Austronesian stock. The team suggested that the Mikea were farmers and became hunter-gatherers, rather than a remnant of a pre-Austronesian wave of African colonists.
The latest evidence leaves little doubt about Austronesian settlement, but their predecessors remain in the shadows. “What is clear is that the island has a complex settlement history involving multiple colonizations by different populations at different times,” Crowther says. Her new study, she adds, contributes “a small piece to the puzzle.”»

The settlement of the Indian Ocean’s largest island is one of the great mysteries in humanity’s colonization of the globe. Madagascar lies just 400 kilometers off the East African coast. Yet the Malagasy people’s cuisine, rituals, and religious beliefs resemble those of Borneo, some 9000 kilometers to the east. Their language is more closely related to Hawaiian than to Bantu, and about half their genes can be traced to Austronesia—that is, Indonesia and the islands of the Pacific. Archaeological evidence of this distant connection was lacking, however.

Now, new studies—recent or soon-to-be-published—trace a wave of Austronesian colonization between 700 C.E. and 1200 C.E. The telltale evidence is, in effect, breadcrumbs: crops distinctive to Austronesia, sprinkled across Madagascar and neighboring islands. “We finally have a signal of this Austronesian expansion,” said Nicole Boivin, an archaeologist and director of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany, who discussed the findings at the recent Society for American Archaeology (SAA) meeting here.

The study by Boivin and her colleagues, published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found that these voyagers did not stop at Madagascar. Some also settled the Comoro Islands, scattered between Madagascar and the African coast. “The discovery of an Austronesian connection for the Comoros is surprising,” says David Burney, a paleobiologist at the National Tropical Botanical Garden in Koloa, Hawaii, who has studied the region. Yet the Austronesians stopped short of the African coast. “There was a culinary frontier,” says Alison Crowther, an archaeologist at the University of Queensland, St. Lucia, in Brisbane, Australia, who led the study.

https://www.sciencemag.org/…/ancient-crop-remains-record-ep…

About This Website

SCIENCEMAG.ORG
Early settlers came from Indonesia and beyond
Like

CommentShare

Comments
Write a comment…
Please follow and like us:
error

RELHEIRAS DA ILHA TERCEIRA

Foi apresentada no VIII FIPED (Fórum Internacional de Pedagogia-Portugal) a comunicação: “Relheiras. uma estrada para o passado”, da autoria de Joao Luis Esquivel, Rui Brasil, Tania Rebelo, Margarida Croft, André Vieira e Félix Rodrigues.

Problema em estudo. Em Portugal são referenciados muitos monumentos como sendo “relheiras”, mas no caso do vertente estudo foi dado ênfase a algumas que existem na ilha Terceira porque estas estruturas açorianas carecem de atrativo e poderiam ser mais informadas. Assim, é possível, acrescentar mais informação sobre elas, nomeadamente, sobre os paralelismos com outras ocorrências semelhantes noutros locais, das hipóteses que se colocam sobre a sua origem e do mistério, que de momento, representam. A valorização destes monumentos contribuirá certamente para dar valor acrescentado à oferta turística e científica dos Açores com a vinda de curiosos e investigadores.
Objetivos. Pretende-se com este trabalho comparar estruturas que se encontram um pouco por todo o mundo, designadas por “cart ruts”, cuja tradução literal do termo em inglês apesar de não ter verbete nos dicionários Oxford ou Cambridge tem, na Internet, um sítio dedicado ao termo que dá uma definição mais específica: “marcas de rodado feitas na rocha com uma largura de eixo de aproximadamente 140 cm” com as designadas “relheiras” da Terceira, que significa, de acordo com vários dicionários de língua portuguesa: “sulco que as rodas de carros deixam na terra”.
Metodologia. A análise tipológica ou comparação tipológica ajuda ao entendimento da evolução tecnológica dos objetos porque tem como pressuposto que as sucessivas gerações de um mesmo objeto herdam das anteriores as características tipológicas. Assim, crê-se ser possível contextualizar os sulcos em rochas da ilha Terceira através de uma leitura da distribuição geográfica do fenómeno global dos “cart ruts”, sem deixar de considerar as explicações etnográficas locais que têm sido atribuídas ao fenómeno “relheiras”.
Resultados e Discussão. Tendo em conta a definição de “cart ruts” como sulcos com uma largura entre eixos fixa de 140 cm, as relheiras da ilha Terceira, possuem nalguns casos uma grande variabilidade de largura entre eixos, variando entre os 127 cm e os 168 cm num mesmo traçado (Passagem das Bestas) pelo que caiem na tipologia global dos “cart ruts”, mas também saem fora dela. Se compararmos cruzamentos entre sulcos de relheiras de um mesmo sistema, a sua tipologia não se afasta do conceito de “cart ruts” que tem uma distribuição geográfica mundial muito ampla. As profundidades de sulcos das relheiras da Terceira têm uma enorme variabilidade à semelhança do que ocorre com outras relheiras, como por exemplo, em Malta.
Conclusões & Recomendações. Para acrescentar outro tipo de informação à que existe sobre as relheiras da Terceira seria importante estudar que tipo de veículos e que capacidade de carga poderia aí ter passado sem que esses sulcos fossem destruídos. Como esses sulcos se encontram em vários tipos de rocha vulcânica na ilha Terceira seria útil fazer esse estudo, que será muito mais complexo do que os de Malta, porque aí os tipos de rochas existentes são sempre muito semelhantes e de natureza sedimentar.
A imagem aqui apresentada foi gentilmente pelos seus autores Paulo Pereira e TVI.

Image may contain: plant, tree, outdoor, nature and water
Please follow and like us:
error

RELHEIRAS EM SÃO MIGUEL

Rilheiras
A ilha de São Miguel Açores já foi maior!
As rilheiras vão diretas para o mar!! Sabem porquê?
Há muitos séculos esta ilha e as outras todas dos Açores foram muito maiores. Numa das fotos vÊ-se uma grande gleba de rocha aberta com cerca de 30 centímetros de largura prestes a cair! Interrogo-me se algumas das rilheiras destas 9 ilhas se não terão sido antes do povoamento. Encontrei algumas que tenho a certeza que são depois do povoamento. Curiosidade: esta gleba de rochas têm muitas toneladas porque a altura de cima para o mar deve ter mais de 10 metros de altura. Registo de dia 7 de Abril de 2019.Abraço doutor Félix Rodrigues

Image may contain: sky, plant, outdoor and nature
Image may contain: plant, sky, outdoor, nature and water
Image may contain: plant, tree, outdoor, nature and water
Comments
Write a comment…
  • Rosário Marques Na ilha de Malta estes trilhos também entram no mar e continuam dentro de água. Isso quer dizer que foram construídas antes de um cataclismo ter acontecido e a geografia se ter alterado. Na verdade não se sabe quem os construiu e utilizou mas são muito antigos.
Please follow and like us:
error

O Ribāt da Arrifana

Identificado em 2001, é uma estrutura única em portugal e remete para o período decisivo do século XII em que Ibn Qasī e Dom Afonso Henriques forjaram uma aliança poderosa. A crónica do Ribat da Arrifana por Rosa Varela Gomes e Mário Varela Gomes. Com Luis Quinta Photography, Anyforms Design de Comunicação, Instituto de Arqueologia e Paleociências (IAP)

NATIONALGEOGRAPHIC.SAPO.PT

Classificado como Monumento Nacional em Junho de 2013, o Ribāt da Arrifana, devido à incúria dos homens e, em particular, das entidades responsáveis pela Cultura, encontra-se totalmente abandonado.

Identificado em 2001, é uma estrutura única em portugal e remete para o período decisivo do século xii em que Ibn Qasī e Dom Afonso Henriques forjaram uma aliança poderosa.

Texto de Rosa Varela Gomes e Mário Varela Gomes

Ilustração: Anyforms

O Ribāt da Arrifana constitui o mais impressionante e historicamente importante conjunto religioso islâmico no Ocidente da Península Ibérica. Trata-se de um sítio quase mítico, mencionado por historiadores e geógrafos muçulmanos, ligado ao mestre sufi, estadista e escritor Ibn Qasī. Entre os textos que o citam encontra-se o de Ibn al-Abbār (1199-1250) que no relato que faz da vida de Ibn Almúndir, um dos mais directos seguidores de Ibn Qasī, menciona que aquele se retirou para o “mosteiro da Arrifana” situado na “orla do mar”. Yaqût, no século XIII, refere a região de al-Rihana que diz situar-se na costa, a norte do cabo do Algarve, hoje de São Vicente. Na história moderna, Alexandre Herculano foi o primeiro a valorizar a figura de Ibn Qasī considerando-o aliado de Dom Afonso Henriques, que lhe terá oferecido um cavalo, uma lança e um escudo, reconhecendo-o por isso como seu par.

Ao longo dos anos, vários investigadores tentaram localizar o Ribāt no interior do Castelo de Aljezur e na fortaleza hoje chamada da Arrifana, edificada em 1635 a norte da Praia do Forte. Todavia, apesar de referências que desde o século XIX indicam a existência de ruínas na chamada Ponta da Atalaia, o Ribāt da Arrifana foi identificado, apenas em 2001, pelos autores, em península incluída na zona outrora chamada Arrifana. Dali é visível, em dias de céu limpo, o cabo de São Vicente tal como, no sentido oposto, se pode observar largo trecho de costa que atinge o cabo Sardão, no Alentejo. O topónimo actual deriva do facto de o minarete existente junto do muro de orações, situado na extremidade daquele local, ter sido transformado em atalaia no século XIV, subsistindo até ao século XVIII.

Várias campanhas arqueológicas ocorridas desde a sua identificação conduziram à descoberta de edificações, erguidas em pedra e taipa, entre as quais nove mesquitas (todas com o respectivo mihrāb orientado para Meca), tal como restos de minarete, muro de orações, vasta necrópole e outras instalações que permitiram reconhecer o local como o famoso Ribāt da Arrifana, fundado pelo mestre sufi Ibn Qasī.

Este terá iniciado o seu movimento político-religioso e criado o Ribāt da Arrifana em data próxima a 1130, junto de importante alcaria ou mesmo de lugar santo, tendo em vista tanto a propagação dos princípios sufis como da sua própria mensagem espiritual, que conduziria à fundação de um estado teocrático.

A localização do Ribāt da Arrifana corresponde a uma estratégia religiosa e político-militar de ocupação de uma “zona de fronteira” tanto entre muçulmanos e cristãos como intermédia do mundo material com o espiritual, significativamente no encontro da Terra com o Mar – no fim do mundo de então. O chão sagrado do Ribāt situava-se afastado dos principais centros de poder almorávida e almoada, sediados em Silves e/ou Faro, contra os quais Ibn Qasī combateu no contexto da guerra santa (djihād).

A importância histórica do sítio advém não só do facto de ser o único ribāt por ora conhecido no actual território português e do qual se sabe o nome do fundador e a data de construção e de abandono, como do protagonismo histórico do que representa. De facto, apenas é conhecido na Península Ibérica outro ribāt, o de Guardamar na costa levantina, mais antigo em cerca de uma centúria. Contrariamente ao que acontece com aquele último, não só conhecemos o nome como parte da vida e obra do fundador do Ribāt da Arrifana, sendo possível deduzir os firmes propósitos da sua fundação, em termos estratégicos e ideológicos ou as causas do seu abandono e destruição, através de factos bem balizados, de teor histórico e cronológico, cruzando-se a informação escrita com a arqueológica.

Os testemunhos arqueológicos indicam que o Ribāt da Arrifana era protegido por um longo muro, de que foram escavados dois sectores, individualizando-o, claramente, e à península onde foi instalado, do território adjacente. Aquele complexo organizava-se, segundo os dados disponíveis, em quatro núcleos de edificações, que mostram planeamento e hierarquização.

Assim, identificou-se a zona por onde se fazia o ingresso no Ribāt, mais próxima do mundo profano, possuindo um grande pátio, muito possivelmente uma escola corânica (madrasa), três mesquitas e outras edificações anexas no lado sudeste, onde se faria a iniciação na doutrina sufi da comunidade.
A nascente das estruturas mencionadas, reconheceu-se uma necrópole, de que foram postas à vista sessenta e cinco sepulturas, sete das quais integralmente investigadas. Estas possuem planta rectangular, mas de diferentes dimensões e constituição, encontrando-se algumas adossadas às qiblas (a parede onde se abre o nicho sagrado ou mihrāb) das mesquitas referidas.

As sepulturas eram assinaladas por tumuli muito baixos, de terra e limitados por muretes de pedras, tal como por pequenas estelas anepígrafas, salvo dois exemplares que oferecem longos textos. Estes encontravam-se ainda erguidos in situ. Identificou-se também uma edificação na zona norte da necrópole, provida de bancada, depósito para água e tina, escavada no solo, apresentando o chão e as paredes bem revestidos com massa: o espaço terá servido para lavar e preparar os mortos para a inumação.

Para ocidente, em zona onde a península da Atalaia estreita, descobriu-se um complexo de construções, formado por quatro mesquitas, uma das quais com grandes dimensões, e um grupo de “vivendas”. O conjunto permitia controlar a passagem para o espaço interior do Ribāt, também defendido pelas altas falésias envolventes, sugerindo que seria o ponto com maior actividade.

Na restante área, identificámos, no lado sul, uma mesquita com anexos num relevo sobranceiro ao mar e, por certo, ocupada por uma personagem destacada, assim como um conjunto de edificações na extremidade da Ponta da Atalaia. Essa zona debruçada sobre o oceano correspondeu ao lugar mais sagrado do Ribāt, ali se tendo descoberto os restos de um “muro de orações” constituindo, muito provavelmente, a primeira construção daquele espaço. A pequena mesquita nas imediações pode ter sido a utilizada pelo mestre, dada a importância simbólica do sítio que ocupa, como pelo facto de junto se encontrar o minarete, de onde os fiéis eram chamados cinco vezes ao dia para fazerem as suas orações. Deveria igualmente funcionar como torre de vigia da costa, função que manteve, mais tarde, com a ocupação cristã.

Please follow and like us:
error

da arqueologia e história nos açores

Mario Jorge Costa and Jacinto Sousa shared a post.
No photo description available.
Félix Rodrigues

Partilha-se artigo da jornalista Paula Gouveia, publicado no Açoriano Oriental, resultado de relatório efetuado pela DRAC e de artigo publicado por mim e por Mario Jorge Costa, no Instituto Histórico da Ilha Terceira.
Só consegui ter acesso a este formato, em imagem

Please follow and like us:
error